Here There Be Flying Elephants (Ask Me How!)

I came up with the following mojo bag several years ago, as part of a homework assignment for an online course some friends and I were taking. I was not sober at the time, but believed I could quit drinking through Witchraft alone — so I lit candles and worked rituals, and, in one particularly epic moment, I smashed a bottle of bourbon at the crossroads. I made it about three weeks before I caved and had what was supposed to be one glass of wine, which turned into multiple glasses, which turned into sloppy drunken escapades until 2012.

What I learned from those experiences is that willpower, even when backed up by formidable training in the Dark Arts, is not enough to keep me sober. First off, I had to actually want to quit drinking (which I didn’t: I just wanted the consequences that were the door prizes of my drinking to stop). Next, I had to actually ask for help, which meant relying not only on the Gods I venerate, but on other recovering alcoholics — which is effing hard, especially for a Olympic-level isolator such as moi.

But I eventually gave up and did just that, and I’ve managed to stay sober ever since. I hung onto that assignment, though, and tweaked the recipe a couple of times. It’s a solid piece of spellcraft, and more than just a folk-magic version of Dumbo’s feather, which totally reminds me of a conversation between myself and my ex-partner:

Him: “What’s that thing hanging by the front door?”

Me: “It’s a protection against thieves and lightning strikes.”

Him: “Um, you’re joking, right?”

Me: “Hey, we haven’t been struck by lightning.”

Him: “…”

The point I’m trying to make is that the talisman described below won’t work on it’s own — it only acts as a bolster, a physical manifestation of the recovering alcoholic’s commitment to remain sober. But strength can be drawn from it. Plus it smells nice. So there’s that.

Anyway, with all that said, I humbly present…

An Herbal Charm to Encourage and Support Continued Sobriety
To be assembled on or just after one’s sobriety date
(or, if preferred, on the first New Moon after your sobriety date)

On a small piece of paper, write your name 12 times. Turn the paper 90 degrees clockwise, then write your intent across your name 12 times (i.e. “Stay Sober,” “Another Year Sober,” “Keep Coming Back,” etc.).

Prepare a small blue cloth bag by smoking the inside with an incense appropriate to your Gods or Higher Power(s). (Sandalwood is a good all-purpose incense.)

Place a piece of amethyst or your desire chip in the bag, and then add the following herbs:

Eucalyptus – to remove evil.
Hyssop – to end crossings.
Althea – for serenity.
Yarrow – for courage.
Solomon’s Seal or Sage – for wisdom.

Fold your name paper in half towards you, then rotate the paper 90 degrees clockwise and fold again; keep turning and folding until the paper will no longer fold. Slide this packet into the bag and tie off with white or orange thread. Anoint the bag on both sides with an oil sacred to one or more of your Higher Powers, then sprinkle it with salt water and pass it through the incense, while invoking your God or Gods via the Serenity Prayer (changing “God” to “Gods” or the specific name of a Deity or Deities, as you see fit).

Keep the finished charm on your person as often as possible, sleep with it under your pillow, and/or place it on your altar or workspace where it will be consistently visible to you. Renew the charm around the same time every year.

2 thoughts on “Here There Be Flying Elephants (Ask Me How!)

  1. Another good thing is to have someone who will support your magic by asking you if you have your mojo bag. I don’t subscribe to it, but had a friend who did something similar for her sobriety. My support was to ask if she had remembered it on occasion (like asking did you remember your sunglasses?). She said it was like reminding her to go to a meeting, because it would bring her into the moment of touching the bag and remembering it meant to be loved and to be soberly loved.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s